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The New York Graduate Plan

 

SECTION ONE:

Diplomatic Training at the United Nations with

THE NEW YORK GRADUATE PLAN

Students will take part in Diplomatic Training at the United Nations. This will provide an opportunity for students to learn more about the United Nations systems and receive training on the  Sustainable Development Goals. As part of the 2030 Agenda, these goals demonstrate the global challenges of the present and sustainable solutions to strive for in the future. Upon completion of the program, students will be given a certificate from the United Nations agency focused on Training and Research.

Facilitated by UN Agencies, the New York Graduate Plan’s Diplomatic Training provides a unique chance for students to learn about diplomacy from diplomats themselves. Though many projects exist with a focus on national and international politics, very few can offer first-hand experience equal to that of the New York Graduate Plan. Through this program, students will gain a stronger comprehension of global challenges and how to resolve them on an international stage. Diplomatic Training will be led by ambassadors, diplomats and delegates at the United Nations.

In order to provide the most authentic learning experience possible, courses will be divided into two sections: lecture and student participation in United Nations forums, including General Assembly sessions.  This will allow students to further develop a global political perspective due to first-hand experience and observation.

In addition to strengthening comprehension on global leadership, Diplomatic Training will afford students an opportunity to gain insight into the daily lives of international leaders. In accordance with the spirit of modern diplomacy, students will be encouraged to think critically and creatively while in cooperation with each other. The final aim is to train students to become more active in their local communities, in the varying political landscapes,  to bring a new generation to the forefront of the international community. This program offers unique access to knowledge and methods that allow participants to act more effectively inside the United Nations and engage in leadership roles in a multilateral environment. Diplomatic Training will consist of practical workshops (concise, accessible, and directly applicable) and is highly interactive. The average period of a workshop is one to two days.

RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT (R2P)

United Nations 101


Lecturer: Dr. Angel Angelov When the United Nations formed in 1945, the organizational structure was set and still operates today, although the roles the various bodies play have changed over time as the United Nations has added Member States and has expanded its global functions. At its founding in 1945, the UN had 51 Members; today UN Membership stands at 193, with two additional Observer States. This course will give a background on six primary committees of the United Nations, an overview of the Charter, the numerous specialized and technical agencies, which today carry out much of the work of the organization. The Charter established six principal organs of the United Nations: The General Assembly, the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, the Trusteeship Council, the International Court of Justice, and the Secretariat. The United Nations family, however, is much larger, encompassing 15 agencies and several programmes and bodies. Together, these six primary organs and the UN specialized, and technical agencies carry out a tremendous amount of work in the world. Though we may hear frequently about contentious or timely Security Council resolutions or dramatic speeches and moments in the General Assembly hall, much of the success and accomplishments of the United Nations is borne in the quiet, day-in-and-day-out work of diplomats and bureaucrats around the world. Course duration: 3-hours │




Regional Organizations and Conflict Resolution


Lecturer: Dr. Angel Angelov This course examines the role of regional organizations in conflict resolution. Special attention is given to the specific and ever-evolving division of labor, based on comparative strengths and weaknesses, between the United Nations and regional organizations (i.e. AU, EU, NATO, CIS and OSCE) in tackling different conflicts (i.e. Kosovo, Ukraine, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Somalia, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Moldova and Macedonia). The relevant policy and scholarly debate is centered on two main arguments. On one hand, it is argued that regional problems require regional solutions; while on the other hand, it is maintained that the regional engagement could be problematic on its own. The course aims at assisting the students in developing analytical skills for critically examining the capabilities and interests of different international organizations. To that end, the students will employ an interdisciplinary tool such as the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis, which facilitates a systematized approach towards the unit and system levels of analysis of international organizations. Course duration: 3-hours |




Democracy and the Pillars of the United Nations Work


Lecturer: Dr. Massimo Tommasoli Developments over the last few years have testified to an increasingly complicated situation for democracy building, following the initial enthusiasm brought about by the end of the Cold War and, more recently, by the so called “Arab awakening”. Analysts have identified a global “backlash” against democracy, and democracy assistance. The “securitization” of the democracy agenda is often perceived as related to such factors as the unfolding of conflict in North Africa and the Middle East, the emergence of violent extremism, the implications of counter-terrorism measures, the shrinking space for civil society in many authoritarian and semi-authoritarian regimes, and the crisis of key democratic values in established democracies, clearly emerging from the ambiguous responses to the migrant and refugee crisis. In the United Nations recent negotiations on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development have shown the sensitivities expressed by many Member States with respect to such issues as democracy, human rights and the rule of law in the face of old and new threats to peace & security and development alike. The seminar aims at producing critical thinking on the role of the United Nations system in democracy building. The learning objective of the seminar will be for participants to clearly articulate the main democracy-related policy issues emerging in current UN mandates and policy debates. The seminar will address the interlinkages between democracy building and the three pillars of UN work: development, human rights, and peace and security. A case study from the Caribbean (Haiti), coupled with examples from other regions, will provide a basis for drawing lessons on the effectiveness of international action for building sustained peace. The analysis will focus on the work of the United Nations on democratization, the efforts by the international community at strengthening democratic institutions and processes, and the role of the main international actors in this Arena. Course duration: 3-hours│




Responsibility to Protect (R2P)


Lecturer: Ms. Jelena Pia-Comella This course is designed to help participants gain greater understanding of the political and constitutional role and responsibilities of the Security Council under the UN Charter and vis-à-vis the other organs of the United Nations system, to learn about the procedures and practice of the Security Council and discuss topical issues on which the Council is deliberating. Ultimately, the Responsibility to Protect principle reinforces sovereignty by helping states to meet their existing responsibilities. It offers fresh programmatic opportunities for the United Nations system to assist states in preventing the listed crimes and violations and in protecting affected populations through capacity building, early warning, and other preventive and protective measures, rather than simply waiting to respond if they fail. Since the adoption of the Responsibility to Protect in 2005, the United Nations Secretary- General has taken a series of steps to elaborate on the principle and guide its practical implementation. Member States have also regularly considered implementation of the principle during formal and informal meetings and the principle has been repeatedly referenced and reaffirmed in relevant United Nations resolutions. It will also introduce the Security Council Presidency and students will receive overviews of the political and legal frameworks. Security Council Sanctions and the Security Council Subsidiary Organs Branch, which assists the Security Council design, implements and evaluates sanctions. Participants will also get an overview of the United Nations global political commitment of responsibility to protect (R2P) embodies a political commitment to end the worst forms of violence and persecution. It seeks to narrow the gap between Member States’ pre-existing obligations under international humanitarian and human rights law and the reality faced by populations at risk of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. Course duration: 3-hours│




Women, Peace and Security


Lecturer: Ms. Jelena Pia-Comella The course is conceived to showcase the Women, peace and security agenda (WPS) as a cross-cutting issue drawing linkages between the WPS agenda, the implementation of the responsibility to protect norm, international justice and the 2030 agenda. Designated to provide participants with an overview of the evolution of the Women peace and security agenda since the adoption of the landmark resolution of the UN Security Council 1325 in 2000, the course will focus on women’s leadership in peace and security, women’s participation in conflict prevention and resolution, women’s access to justice for sexual and gender-based violence in conflict. Current geopolitics such as countering violent extremism and addressing masculinities and conflict dynamics will provide participants with an overview and analysis how these issues shape the current WPS agenda. Course duration: 3-hours│




The Sustainable Development Goals & the 2030 Agenda


Lecturer: H.E. Dr. David O’Connor The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs). This course will provide and overview of the UN 2030 Agenda, the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, its targets and metrics. Course duration: 3-hours │




International Criminal Justice


Lecturer: H.E. Mr. Yuriy Sergeyev This course is to give students a broad understanding of international law-upholding, law-enforcement and law-protecting practice and means, which results in the implementation of international judicial power based on the mechanisms, legal acts, norms and principles adopted by the international community primarily by UN. The role of the International Court of Justice, The International Criminal Court (ICC), Hybrid courts, Ad hoc courts, Tribunals will be observed. The issue of interrelations between “international justice, universal jurisdiction and a state judicial sovereignty" will be a core of theoretical discussions during the course. Students will be acquainted with resolutions and decisions adopted by the UN General Assembly on items related to “international justice” and allocated to the Sixth (legal) Committee. Course duration: 3-hours│




Climate Change and the Paris Agreement


Lecturer: Professor Narinder Kakar In December 2015, countries adopted the new historic Paris Agreement on climate change. For the first time, 195 Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) pledged to curb emissions, strengthen resilience and join to take common climate action. This followed two weeks of negotiations at the United Nations climate change conference (COP21). The course will include discussion on the impact of the climate deal and its meaning for the world, reflection on the necessary efforts countries will need to make to achieve the commitments, and deliberation on the financial frameworks needed to implement the agreement in developed and developing countries. Students will gain insights into the Paris Agreement as well and ongoing international climate negotiations. Course duration: 3-hours│





Responsibility

to Protect

(R2P)

Women, Peace and Security

Diplomatic Training at

THE UNITED NATIONS

United

Nations

101

Regional Organizations and Conflict Resolution

Democracy and the Pillars of the United Nations Work

The Sustainable Development Goals & the 2030 Agenda

International Criminal Justice

Climate Change and the Paris Agreement

APPLY TODAY

The New York Graduate Plan offers applicants an opportunity unlike any other program of its kind. Through our curriculum, locations and field opportunities, we will provide participants with the tools and support needed to ensure individual success. We invite interested applicants to apply through the link below and take the first steps toward changing the world today.

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Gain Experience with the United Nations